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One of My Major Food Groups: Indispensible Butter

I am going  crazy trying to find quality dairy products!

I use a good amount of  butter to cook eggs, for baking, or to spread on a slab of a good crusty loaf with honey. Yum yum! I could live on butter and honey!

My favorite!!!  Yummy Yummy Yummy

My favorite!!! Yummy Yummy Yummy

My very favorite store-bought butter is Pamplie from France.  (Yes, I prefer it to Echire).  I used to be able to find it at a local specialty shop and it is worth every penny it costs.  However, they stopped carrying it.

Almost cheesy-rich

Almost cheesy-rich

Instead the shop now has Delitia butter from Parmigiano Reggiano which is also very good.  It is an incredibly rich butter which is extremely firm, so I imagine the water content must be low which makes it very good for baking.  I have made incredibly intense shortbread cookies out of this butter.

Bullshit Butter

Bullshit Butter

plugra 2Plugrá, used by many in high-end restaurants and bakers here in the U.S., is bullshit butter.  The reason I say this is because they add butter flavoring (probably manufactured in a chemical plant in New Jersey) to their butter!!!!  The milk they are using is not certified rBGH free.  Plugrá is also part of the Dairy Farmers of America Association, accused of being a milk cartel.

If you have to get grocery-store butter, this is probably your best bet for flavor.

If you have to get grocery-store butter, this is probably your best bet for flavor.

Président is from France.   For a larger brand, it has very good flavor, especially when compared to that of most others found in groceries here in the U.S.  I do not trust that it hasn’t been made with livestock eating a bunch of pesticides (which are concentrated in animal fat), however rBGH is outlawed in the EU.  I suppose the U.S. could possibly ship milk from here to sell to companies such as Lactalis, the French parent company of Président, as long as the product is then shipped back here to the United States for consumption.  I am not sure what the laws are.  On Lactalis’s page, they list “cost optimisation” and “increase in yields” as benefits to using their products.   It has me leery.  So I try to buy only buy organic.  Unfortunately, all the store-bought organic butter I have tasted is insipid or tastes like it has been in the refrigerator case too long.

Dean Foods, a large food corporation which funded the defeat of Proposition 37 here in California, is the parent company of Horizon Organics.  Horizon Organics is about the only supplier of organic milk products I can find in my neighborhood grocery, but I am still boycotting them for now.  Hopefully they will get rid of Dean Foods as a parent company so I can go back.

Local-ish.  Supported Proposition 37.

Local-ish. Supported Proposition 37.

What I now plan on doing is driving to a grocery further away and buying organic cream from Straus Family Creamery or Organic Valley  (their butters, along with Horizon’s, are among those which I stated as tasting prosaic or refrigeratory).  Out of these I plan on making my own butter.

The video below shows you how easy it is to do and the chemistry behind it.

I will let you know how it comes out!

Thank you to Working Cows Dairy in Alabama for posting this video on their Facebook Page!

Moooooooo!

About ninasbreakfast

“Let’s take a trip, me and you, let’s go the scenic route…headlong into the irresistible orbit” –The band, Morphine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMmsmPykxiU

5 responses to “One of My Major Food Groups: Indispensible Butter

  1. So, I had to try this right away. I broke down and bought Horizon heavy whipping cream when I saw it in the grocery store last night. I figured at least I would be supporting my grocery to carry organics in general.

    It took a lot longer than three minutes to shake it manually, but eventually I had butter. And it is delicious.

    I appreciate knowing the science of how I can make butter after the zombie apocalypse if we don’t have any electricity and as long as I have an animal that produces enough dairy, but you can do this much easier using an electric mixer, blender, or beaters.

    Also, he doesn’t stress the importance of rinsing the butter and draining it. You may need several changes of cold water. You want to rinse the butter until the water looks pretty clear, and then you will want to spend at LEAST a couple of minutes squeezing out the water. This is probably better done with a rubber spatula, but you can use your hands.

    If you are going to salt, do so after the butter is made so that you don’t end up with salty buttermilk and loosing it in the rinsing.

    Press into a pretty ramekin and give as a hostess gift!!!

  2. For cultured butter: pour the cream out into a glass, top with a saucer, and leave it for about 16-20 hours. Alternatively, you can blend whole milk yogurt to the cream before leaving it overnight. As long as your cream starter isn’t bubbling when you go to churn it, it will be good to go!

  3. Pingback: What Could Be Better? « Nina's Breakfast

  4. Another thing, I would beat it until it is more solid than what it appears to be in the video. Especially if you are baking, you want to make certain to break as many of the “balloons” as possible. My batch produced a lot more buttermilk. I think I shook it for about ten minutes total with a few breaks in between.

  5. AAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGGGG!!!!!!!
    So I decided to read the ingredients on the ORGANIC heavy whipping creams I bought to make my own butter. Horizon and Organic Valley both have additives in them!!!! Specifically they have carrageenan, which is a food additive used as a thickener. It is used scientifically in experiments to ” induce intense inflamation in experimental animals”. It also appears to make tumors grow faster and spread more widely in control animals. Why is it so difficult to have real food here in the States???!
    :(

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